Monday, June 20, 2011

how to change the clutch on 1985 Toyota Celica?

Clutch:--

PEDAL HEIGHT



Pedal height is the distance between the floor of the car and the top of the clutch pedal pad. It should be 6.3-6.6 inches (160-167mm) and 6.06-6.46 inches (153-164mm) on later models. To adjust it, loosen the locknut on the stopper at the top of the clutch pedal and then turn the adjusting nut until the pedal height is within specifications. After adjusting the height, always tighten the locknut again.

FREE-PLAY



See Figure 1



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Fig. Fig. 1: Clutch pedal adjustment points

Clutch pedal free-play is the distance that the pedal travels from the rest position until the beginning of clutch resistance can just be felt. It should be 1.00-1.75 inches (25-44mm) on 1971-77 models, 0.2-0.6 inches (5-15mm) on 1978-79 models, 0.51-0.91 inches (12-23mm) on 1980-81 models and 0.20-0.59 inches (5-14mm) on 1982-85 models. To adjust, loosen the locknut on the master cylinder pushrod and turn the adjusting nut until the proper free-play is achieved. Don't forget to retighten the locknut.


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Driven Disc and Pressure Plate


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 28



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Fig. Fig. 1: Exploded view of the clutch assembly-1971-80 models



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Fig. Fig. 2: Exploded view of the clutch assembly-1981-85 models



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Fig. Fig. 3: View of the clutch and pressure plate assembly



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Fig. Fig. 4: Loosen and remove the pressure plate retaining bolts evenly, a little at a time



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Fig. Fig. 5: Remove the pressure plate ...



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Fig. Fig. 6: ... then carefully remove the driven disc (clutch disc) from the flywheel



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Fig. Fig. 7: View of the flywheel once the clutch assembly is removed



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Fig. Fig. 8: Check across the flywheel surface; it should be flat



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Fig. Fig. 9: Check the pressure plate for excessive wear



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Fig. Fig. 10: If necessary, lock the flywheel in place and remove the retaining bolts ...



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Fig. Fig. 11: ... then remove the flywheel from the crankshaft in order to replace it or have it machined



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Fig. Fig. 12: Upon installation, it is usually a good idea to apply a threadlocking compound to the flywheel bolts



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Fig. Fig. 13: Be sure that the flywheel surface is clean, before installing the clutch



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Fig. Fig. 14: Insert a clutch alignment arbor, to align the clutch assembly during installation



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Fig. Fig. 15: Clutch disc installed with the arbor in place



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Fig. Fig. 16: Clutch cover and pressure plate installed with the alignment arbor in place



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Fig. Fig. 17: The pressure plate-to-flywheel bolt holes should align



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Fig. Fig. 18: You may want to use a threadlocking compound on the clutch assembly bolts



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Fig. Fig. 19: Be sure to use a torque wrench to tighten all bolts



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Fig. Fig. 20: Bolt tightening sequence to be performed in 2-3 stages



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Fig. Fig. 21: Grease the clutch release fork ball



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Fig. Fig. 22: View of the clutch release fork; check this for signs of damage



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Fig. Fig. 23: View of the clutch release fork bearing clips; make sure these are not bent or broken



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Fig. Fig. 24: Removing the clutch release fork bearing clips



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Fig. Fig. 25: Grease the throwout bearing assembly at the outer contact points



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Fig. Fig. 26: Grease the throwout bearing assembly at the inner contact points



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Fig. Fig. 27: Installing the clutch release fork bearing clip



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Fig. Fig. 28: View of the installed clutch release fork assembly; be sure all parts move freely


WARNING
Do not drain the transmission oil and do not allow grease or oil to get on any part of the clutch disc, pressure plate or flywheel surfaces.

  1. Remove the transmission from the car as previously detailed.
  2. Loosen the set bolts one turn at a time until the spring tension is relieved.
  3. Remove the set bolts and then pull off the clutch assembly.
  4. Unfasten the release fork bearing clips. Withdraw the release bearing hub, complete with the release bearing.
  5. Remove the tension spring from the clutch linkage.
  6. Remove the release fork and support.
  7. Punch matchmarks on the clutch cover and the pressure plate so that the pressure plate can be returned to its original position during installation.


CAUTION
If the screws are released too fast, the clutch assembly will fly apart, causing possible injury or loss of parts.

  1. Slowly unfasten the screws which attach the retracting springs.
  2. Separate the clutch cover and pressure plate from the clutch disc/spring assembly.


CAUTION
The clutch driven disc may contain asbestos, which has been determined to be a cancer causing agent. Avoid inhaling any dust from any clutch surface! When cleaning clutch surfaces, use a commercially available brake cleaning fluid. Never clean clutch surfaces with compressed air.

  1. Inspect the parts for wear or deterioration. Replace parts as required.
  2. Installation is performed in the reverse order of removal. Several points should be noted, however.
    1. Be sure to align the matchmarks on the clutch cover and pressure plate which were made during disassembly.
    2. Apply a thin coating of multi-purpose grease to the release bearing hub and release fork contact points. Pack the groove inside the clutch hub with multi-purpose grease.
    3. Center the clutch disc by using a clutch pilot tool or an old input shaft. Insert the pilot into the end of the input shaft front bearing and bolt the clutch to the flywheel.


Bolt the clutch assembly to the flywheel in two or three stages, evenly to 15-22 ft. lbs. (20-29 Nm).

  1. Adjust the clutch as outlined earlier in this section.
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Master Cylinder


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 and 2



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Fig. Fig. 1: To separate the pushrod (1) from the clutch pedal (3), remove the clevis pin (2)



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Fig. Fig. 2: Exploded view of the disassembled clutch master cylinder


WARNING
Do not spill brake fluid on the painted surfaces of the vehicle.

  1. Remove the clevis pin.
  2. Detach the hydraulic line from the tube.
  3. Unfasten the bolts which secure the master cylinder to the fire wall. Withdraw the assembly.
  4. Installation is performed in the reverse order of removal. Bleed the system as detailed following. Adjust the clutch pedal height and free-play as previously detailed.

OVERHAUL



Overhaul and assemble the master cylinder only in a clean working area.

  1. Clamp the master cylinder body in a vise with soft jaws.
  2. Separate the reservoir assembly from the master cylinder.
  3. Remove the snapring and remove the pushrod/piston assembly.
  4. Inspect all of the parts and replace nay which are worn or defective.

To assemble:
  1. Coat all parts with clean brake fluid, prior to assembly.
  2. Install the piston assembly in the cylinder bore.
  3. Fit the pushrod over the washer and secure them with the snapring.
  4. Install the reservoir.
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Slave Cylinder


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figure 1



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Fig. Fig. 1: Exploded view of a disassembled clutch slave cylinder


WARNING
Do not spill brake fluid on the vehicle's painted surface.

  1. Raise the front of the car and support it with jackstands. Be sure that it is supported securely.
  2. If necessary, remove the rear gravel shield to gain access to the release cylinder.
  3. Remove the clutch fork return spring.
  4. Unfasten the hydraulic line from the release cylinder by removing its retaining nut.
  5. Screw the threaded end of the pushrod in.
  6. Remove the release cylinder retaining nuts and remove the cylinder.
  7. Installation is performed in the reverse order of removal. Adjust the pushrod free-play and bleed the hydraulic system.

OVERHAUL



Overhaul the slave cylinder in a clean working area.

  1. Remove the pushrod assembly and the rubber boot.
  2. Withdraw the piston, complete with its cup; don't remove the cup unless it is being replaced.
  3. Wash all the parts in brake fluid.
  4. Replace any worn or damaged parts.
  5. Replace the cylinder assembly if the piston-to-bore clearance is greater than 0.006 inches (0.152mm).
  6. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly. Coat all parts in clean brake fluid or rubber grease, prior to assembly.

HYDRAULIC SYSTEM BLEEDING



See Figure 2

This operation must be performed any time the clutch master or slave cylinder has been removed or if any of the hydraulic lines have been opened.


WARNING
Do not spill brake fluid on the bodywork of the vehicle; it will destroy the paint. If fluid is spilled, immediately wash the surface with plenty of clean water.

  1. Fill the master cylinder reservoir with brake fluid.
  2. Remove the cap on the bleeder screw on the clutch slave cylinder. Install a clear vinyl hose on the fitting; place the other end submerged in a clear glass jar partially filled with brake fluid.
  3. Have an assistant pump the clutch pedal slowly several times. After several pumps, hold the pedal down and open the bleeder, allowing fluid to flow into the jar. Close the bleeder valve almost immediately after opening it. Release the pedal only after the bleeder is closed.
  4. Repeat the process until the fluid in the hose contains no air bubbles. tube. When there are no more air bubbles in the system, tighten the plug fully with the pedal depressed. Replace the plastic cap.
  5. Fill the clutch master cylinder reservoir to the correct level with brake fluid.
  6. Check the system for leaks.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 2: When bleeding the clutch hydraulic system, use a jar to collect the fluid


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Understanding the Clutch


The purpose of the clutch is to disconnect and connect engine power at the transmission. A vehicle at rest requires a lot of engine torque to get all that weight moving. An internal combustion engine does not develop a high starting torque (unlike steam engines) so it must be allowed to operate without any load until it builds up enough torque to move the vehicle. To a point, torque increases with engine rpm. The clutch allows the engine to build up torque by physically disconnecting the engine from the transmission, relieving the engine of any load or resistance.

The transfer of engine power to the transmission (the load) must be smooth and gradual; if it weren't, drive line components would wear out or break quickly. This gradual power transfer is made possible by gradually releasing the clutch pedal. The clutch disc and pressure plate are the connecting link between the engine and transmission. When the clutch pedal is released, the disc and plate contact each other (the clutch is engaged) physically joining the engine and transmission. When the pedal is pushed in, the disc and plate separate (the clutch is disengaged) disconnecting the engine from the transmission.

Most clutch assemblies consists of the flywheel, the clutch disc, the clutch pressure plate, the throw out bearing and fork, the actuating linkage and the pedal. The flywheel and clutch pressure plate (driving members) are connected to the engine crankshaft and rotate with it. The clutch disc is located between the flywheel and pressure plate, and is splined to the transmission shaft. A driving member is one that is attached to the engine and transfers engine power to a driven member (clutch disc) on the transmission shaft. A driving member (pressure plate) rotates (drives) a driven member (clutch disc) on contact and, in so doing, turns the transmission shaft.

There is a circular diaphragm spring within the pressure plate cover (transmission side). In a relaxed state (when the clutch pedal is fully released) this spring is convex; that is, it is dished outward toward the transmission. Pushing in the clutch pedal actuates the attached linkage. Connected to the other end of this is the throw out fork, which hold the throw out bearing. When the clutch pedal is depressed, the clutch linkage pushes the fork and bearing forward to contact the diaphragm spring of the pressure plate. The outer edges of the spring are secured to the pressure plate and are pivoted on rings so that when the center of the spring is compressed by the throw out bearing, the outer edges bow outward and, by so doing, pull the pressure plate in the same direction - away from the clutch disc. This action separates the disc from the plate, disengaging the clutch and allowing the transmission to be shifted into another gear. A coil type clutch return spring attached to the clutch pedal arm permits full release of the pedal. Releasing the pedal pulls the throw out bearing away from the diaphragm spring resulting in a reversal of spring position. As bearing pressure is gradually released from the spring center, the outer edges of the spring bow outward, pushing the pressure plate into closer contact with the clutch disc. As the disc and plate move closer together, friction between the two increases and slippage is reduced until, when full spring pressure is applied (by fully releasing the pedal), the speed of the disc and plate are the same. This stops all slipping, creating a direct connection between the plate and disc, which results in the transfer of power from the engine to the transmission. The clutch disc then rotates with the pressure plate at engine speed and, because it is splined to the transmission shaft, the shaft turns at the same engine speed.

The clutch is operating properly if:

  1. It will stall the engine when released with the vehicle held stationary.
  2. The shift lever can be moved freely between 1st and reverse gears when the vehicle is stationary and the clutch disengaged.


CAUTION
The clutch driven disc may contain asbestos, which has been determined to be a cancer causing agent. Never clean the clutch surfaces with compressed air! Avoid inhaling any dust from any clutch surface! When cleaning the clutch surfaces, use a commercially available brake cleaning fluid.
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Driveshaft and U-Joints


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8



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Fig. Fig. 1: Scribe alignment marks on the two rear flanges before removal



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Fig. Fig. 2: Exploded view of the driveshaft assembly



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Fig. Fig. 3: Remove the center support bearing mounting bolts



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Fig. Fig. 4: Remove the propeller shaft from the intermediate shaft; the line indicates the matchmarks



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Fig. Fig. 5: After removing the retaining nut, slide the center support bearing and flange off the intermediate shaft. Note the matchmarks



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Fig. Fig. 6: Once installed, use a hammer and punch to stake the center support bearing retaining nut



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Fig. Fig. 7: Tighten the support bearing to the body of the car



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Fig. Fig. 8: Proper positiong of the support bearing is crucial

  1. Raise the rear of the car and support the rear axle housing with jackstands.


CAUTION
Be sure that the car is securely supported. Remember, you will be working underneath it!

  1. Scribe alignment marks on the two rear flanges (one comes out of the differential and one is attached to the propeller shaft; they are both attached to each other).
  2. Loosen the four attaching bolts and remove the U-joint flange from the differential flange.
  3. Remove the two bolts which hold the center support bearing to the body.
  4. Pull on the driveshaft assembly so as to remove the yoke from the transmission.

Quickly insert a transmission plug or an old rag into the transmission to prevent fluid leakage.

  1. Scribe alignment marks across the two forward flanges of the propeller (rear) shaft.
  2. Unscrew the four bolts and remove the propeller shaft form the intermediate (front) shaft.
  3. Put alignment marks on the flange (attached to the center support bearing) and the intermediate shaft and then unscrew the retaining nut.
  4. Slide the flange and the center support bearing off the intermediate shaft.

To install:
  1. Coat the splines on the rear of the intermediate shaft with multi-purpose grease.
  2. Slide the bearing and the flange onto the shaft and align the marks.
  3. Place the flange in a soft jawed vise and install a new nut to press the bearing into position. Tighten the nut to 123-144 ft. lbs. (166-195 Nm). Loosen the nut and then tighten it again, this time to 19-25 ft. lbs. (26-34 Nm).
  4. Using a hammer and a punch, stake the nut.
  5. Align the marks on the bearing flange and the propeller shaft flange and insert the bolts. Tighten the bolts to 15-28 ft. lbs. (20-37 Nm).
  6. Insert the yoke on the intermediate shaft into the transmission.
  7. Align the marks on the propeller shaft flange and the differential flange and insert the bolts. Tighten the bolts to 15-28 ft. lbs. (20-37 Nm).
  8. Place a height spacer between the body and the center support bearing and install the two mounting bolts finger-tight.
  9. Check that the bearing bracket is at right angles to the propeller shaft. Adjust if necessary.
  10. Check that the center line of the bearing is set to the center line of the bracket when the car is in the no-load condition. Adjust if necessary.
  11. Tighten the bearing mounting bolts to 22-32 ft. lbs. (29-43 Nm).

U-JOINT OVERHAUL



1970-81 Models

See Figure 9



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Fig. Fig. 9: Snapring assortment chart

  1. Matchmark the yoke and the driveshaft.
  2. Remove the snaprings from the bearings.
  3. Position the yoke on vise jaws. Using a bearing remove and a hammer, gently tap the remove until the bearing is driven out of the yoke about 1/ 2 inch (12mm).
  4. Place the tool in the vise and drive the yoke away from the tool until the bearing is removed.
  5. Repeat Steps 3 and 4 for the other bearings.
  6. Check for worn or damaged parts. Inspect the bearing journal surfaces for wear.

To install:
  1. Install the bearing cups, seals, and O-rings in the spider.
  2. Grease the spider and the bearings.
  3. Position the spider in the yoke.
  4. Start the bearings in the yoke and then press them into place, using a vise.
  5. Repeat Step 4 for the other bearings.
  6. If the axial play of the spider is greater than 0.002 inches (0.05mm), select snaprings which will provide the correct play. Be sure that the snaprings are the same size on both sides or driveshaft noise and vibration will result.
  7. Check the U-joint assembly for smooth operation.

1982-85 Models

As the U-joints on 1982-85 models are non-serviceable, the entire driveshaft must be replaced in the event of U-joint problems.

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BLEEDING THE BRAKES:--------Bleeding Brake System

See Figure 1



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Fig. Fig. 1: Bleed the brakes into a half filled jar of brake fluid


WARNING
Do not reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the brake system.

  1. Insert a clear vinyl tube into the bleeder plug on the master cylinder or the wheel cylinders.

If the master cylinder has been overhauled or if air is present in it, start the bleeding procedure with the master cylinder. Otherwise (and after bleeding the master cylinder), start with the wheel cylinder which is farthest from the master cylinder.

  1. Insert the other end of the tube into a jar which is half filled with brake fluid.
  2. Have an assistant slowly pump the brake pedal several times. On the last pump, have the assistant hold the pedal to the floor (fully depressed). While the pedal is depressed, open the bleeder plug until fluid starts to run out, then close the plug.

If the brake pedal is depressed too fast, small air bubbles will form in the brake fluid which will be very difficult to remove.

  1. Bleed the cylinder before hydraulic pressure decreases in the cylinder.
  2. Repeat this procedure until the air bubbles are removed and then go on to the next wheel cylinder.


WARNING
Replenish the brake fluid in the master cylinder reservoir, so that it does not run out during bleeding.


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Brake Hoses and Pipes


Brake Hose
  1. Raise the end of the vehicle which contains the hose to be repaired, then support the vehicle safely using jackstands.
  2. If necessary, remove the wheel for easier access to the hose.
  3. Disconnect the hose from the wheel cylinder or caliper and plug the opening to avoid excessive fluid loss or contamination.
  4. Disconnect the hose from the brake line and plug the openings to avoid excessive fluid loss or contamination.

To install:
  1. Install the brake hose to the brake line and tighten to 14 ft. lbs. (19 Nm) for rear brakes or 18 ft. lbs. (24 Nm) for front brakes.
  2. If installing a front brake hose, make sure the hose is routed properly, with the loop to the rear of the vehicle.
  3. Install the hose to the wheel cylinder or caliper using NEW washers, then tighten the retainer to 36 ft. lbs. (49 Nm).
  4. Properly bleed the brake system, then check the connections for leaks.
  5. Remove the supports and carefully lower the vehicle.

Brake Line

There are 2 options available when replacing a brake line. The first, and probably most preferable, is to replace the entire line using a line of similar length which is already equipped with machined flared ends. Such lines are usually available from auto parts stores and usually require only a minimum of bending in order to properly fit then to the vehicle. The second option is to bend and flare the entire replacement line (or a repair section of line) using the appropriate tools.

Buying a line with machined flares is usually preferable because of the time and effort saved, not to mention the cost of special tools if they are not readily available. Also, machined flares are usually of a much higher quality than those produced by hand flaring tools or kits.

  1. Raise the end of the vehicle which contains the hose to be repaired, then support the vehicle safely using jackstands.
  2. Remove the components necessary for access to the brake line which is being replaced.
  3. Disconnect the fittings at each end of the line, then plug the openings to prevent excessive fluid loss or contamination.
  4. Trace the line from 1 end to the other and disconnect the line from any retaining clips, then remove the line from the vehicle.

To install:
  1. Try to obtain a replacement line that is the same length as the line that was removed. If the line is longer, you will have to cut it and flare the end, or if you have decided to repair a portion of the line, see the procedure on brake line flaring, later in this section.
  2. Use a suitable tubing bender to make the necessary bends in the line. Work slowly and carefully; try to make the bends look as close as possible to those on the line being replaced.

When bending the brake line, be careful not to kink or crack the line. If the brake line becomes kinked or cracked, it must be replaced.

  1. Before installing the brake line, flush it with brake cleaner to remove any dirt or foreign material.
  2. Install the line into the vehicle. Be sure to attach the line to the retaining clips, as necessary. Make sure the replacement brake line does not contact any components that could rub the line and cause a leak.
  3. Connect the brake line fittings and tighten to 18 ft. lbs. (24 Nm), except for the rear line-to-hose fitting which should be tightened to 14 ft. lbs. (19 Nm).
  4. Properly bleed the brake system and check for leaks.
  5. Install any removed components, then remove the supports and carefully lower the vehicle.

BRAKE LINE FLARING



Use only brake line tubing approved for automotive use; never use copper tubing. Whenever possible, try to work with brake lines that are already cut to the length needed. These lines are available at most auto parts stores and have machine made flares, the quality of which is hard to duplicate with most of the available inexpensive flaring kits.

When the brakes are applied, there is a great amount of pressure developed in the hydraulic system. An improperly formed flare can leak with resultant loss of stopping power. If you have never formed a double-flare, take time to familiarize yourself with the flaring kit; practice forming double-flares on scrap tubing until you are satisfied with the results.

The following procedure applies to the SA9193BR flaring kit, but should be similar to commercially available brake-line flaring kits. If these instructions differ in any way from those in your kit, follow the instructions in the kit.

  1. Determine the length necessary for the replacement or repair and allow an additional 1 / 8 in. (3.2mm) for each flare. Select a piece of tubing, then cut the brake line to the necessary length using an appropriate saw. Do not use a tubing cutter.
  2. Square the end of the tube with a file and chamfer the edges. Remove burrs from the inside and outside diameters of the cut line using a deburring tool.
  3. Install the required fittings onto the line.
  4. Install SA9193BR, or an equivalent flaring tool, into a vice and install the handle into the operating cam.
  5. Loosen the die clamp screw and rotate the locking plate to expose the die carrier opening.
  6. Select the required die set (4.75mm DIN) and install in the carrier with the full side of either half facing clamp screw and counter bore of both halves facing punch turret.
  7. Insert the prepared line through the rear of the die and push forward until the line end is flush with the die face.
  8. Make sure the rear of both halves of the die rest against the hexagon die stops, then rotate the locking plate to the fully closed position and clamp the die firmly by tightening the clamp screw.
  9. Rotate the punch turret until the appropriate size (4.75mm DIN) points towards the open end of the line to be flared.
  10. Pull the operating handle against the line resistance in order to create the flare, then return the handle to the original position.
  11. Release the clamp screw and rotate the locking plate to the open position.
  12. Remove the die set and line, then separate by gently tapping both halves on the bench. Inspect the flare for proper size and shape. Dimension A should be 0.272-0.286 inch (6.92-7.28mm).
  13. If necessary, repeat Steps 2-12 for the other end of the line or for the end of the line which is being repaired.
  14. Bend the replacement line or section using SA91108NE, or an equivalent line bending tool.
  15. If repairing the original line, join the old and new sections using a female union and tighten.
--------------------

Master Cylinder


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 and 2



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 1: Using a brake line wrench, disconnect the hydraulic lines from the master cylinder



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Fig. Fig. 2: Remove the four mounting nuts to separate the cylinder from the booster


WARNING
Be careful not to spill brake fluid on the painted surfaces of the vehicle; it will damage the paint.

  1. Unfasten the hydraulic lines from the master cylinder.
  2. Detach the hydraulic fluid pressure differential switch wiring connectors. On models with a brake fluid level warning switch, detach the sensor's wiring connectors, as well.
  3. Loosen the master cylinder reservoir mounting bolt.
  4. Then do one of the following:
    1. On models with manual brakes, remove the master cylinder securing bolts and the clevis pin from the brake pedal. Remove the master cylinder.
    2. On models with power brakes, unfasten the nuts and remove the master cylinder assembly from the power brake unit.

  5. Installation is performed in the reverse order of removal. Note the following, however:

    Certain models have an "UP" mark on the cylinder boot, make sure this is in the correct position.
    Before tightening the master cylinder mounting nuts or bolts, screw the hydraulic line into the cylinder body a few turns.
    After installation is completed, bleed the master cylinder and the brake system, as outlined later in this section.
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Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 4: Exploded view of the brake master cylinder-1980 shown; others are similar



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Fig. Fig. 5: With the cylinder in a vise, separate the reservoir from the unit



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Fig. Fig. 6: Push the pistons in all the way and remove the stopper bolt



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Fig. Fig. 7: Use a pair of snapring pliers to remove the snapring



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Fig. Fig. 8: Apply lithium grease to the rubber parts of the piston



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Fig. Fig. 9: When installing, confirm that the UP mark of the boot is in the correct position



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Fig. Fig. 10: Adjust the length of the booster pushrod before installing the master cylinder



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Fig. Fig. 11: Fill the reservoir and bleed the system of air BEFORE driving

  1. Place the cylinder securely in a vise. Remove the reservoir caps and floats. Unscrew the bolts which secure the reservoir(s) to the main body.
  2. Remove the pressure differential warning switch assembly. Then, working from the rear of the cylinder, remove the boot, snapring, stop washer, piston No. 1, spacer, cylinder cup, spring retainer, and spring, in that order.
  3. Remove the end plug and gasket from the front of the cylinder, then remove the front piston stop bolt from underneath. Pull out the spring, retainer, piston No. 2, spacer, and the cylinder cup.
  4. Remove the two outlet fittings, washers, check valves and springs.
  5. Remove the piston cups from their seats only if they are to be replaced.

After washing all parts in clean brake fluid, dry them with compressed air (if available). Drying parts with a shop rag can deposit lint and dirt particles inside the assembled master cylinder. Inspect the cylinder bore for wear, scuff marks, or nicks. Cylinders may be honed slightly, but the limits is 0.006 inch (0.152mm). In view of the importance of the master cylinder, it is recommended that it is replaced rather than overhauled if worn or damaged.


WARNING
Clean, high quality brake fluid is essential to the safe and proper operation of the brake system. You should always buy the highest quality brake fluid that is available. If the brake fluid becomes contaminated, drain and flush the system, then refill the master cylinder with new fluid. Never reuse any brake fluid. Any brake fluid that is removed from the system should be discarded.

  1. Assembly is performed in the reverse order of disassembly. Absolute cleanliness is essential. Coat all parts with clean brake fluid prior to assembly.
  2. Bleed the hydraulic system after the master cylinder is installed, as detailed later in this section.
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Brake Caliper


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1, 2 and 3



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 1: Remove the lower mounting bolt



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Fig. Fig. 2: Slide the caliper off of the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 3: Separate the brake hose from the caliper

If you plan to overhaul the caliper, then you only need to pivot the caliper (brake cylinder) upward, as detailed previously in the Brake Pad removal and installation procedure. If the whole assembly must be removed (such as to remove the brake disc), unscrew the two mounting bolts on the back of the caliper mounting frame and pull the whole assembly off of the disc. Do not let the caliper hang by its hose.


1982-85 Models
  1. Remove the sliding bushing and boot.
  2. Carefully remove the main pin boot with a chisel.
  3. Apply compressed air to the brake line union to force the piston out of its bore. Be careful, the piston may come out with great force!
  4. Remove the cylinder boot and set ring from the cylinder.
  5. Carefully pry the piston seal out of the cylinder bore. Check the piston and cylinder bore for wear and/or corrosion. Clean all metal components in clean brake fluid; replace any rubber part that is visibly worn or damaged.

To assemble:
  1. Coat all components with clean brake fluid.
  2. Install the seal and piston in the cylinder bore, after coating them with the rubber lubricant supplied in the rebuilding kit. Seat the piston in the bore with your fingers.
  3. Fit the boot into the groove in the cylinder bore.
  4. Install the caliper assembly. Install a new main pin boot by pressing it on with a 21mm socket. When installing the caliper onto the main pin, make sure the boot end is installed into the groove on the main pin.
  5. Bleed the brake system.
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Brake Disc (Rotor)


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



  1. Remove the brake pads and the caliper, as previously detailed.
  2. Check the disc run-out, as detailed following, at this point. Make a note of the results for use during installation.
  3. Remove the grease cap from the hub. Remove the cotter pin and the castellated nut.
  4. Remove the wheel hub with the brake disc attached.
  5. Perform the disc inspection procedure, as outlined in the following information.

To install:
  1. Coat the hub oil seal lip with multi-purpose grease and install the disc/hub assembly.
  2. Adjust the wheel bearing preload, as detailed following.
  3. Measure the disc run-out. Check it against the specifications in the Brake Specifications chart and against the figures noted during removal.

If the wheel bearing nut is improperly tightened, disc run-out will be affected.

  1. Install the remainder of the components as outlined in the appropriate preceding information.
  2. Bleed the brake system.
  3. Road test the car. Check the wheel bearing preload.

INSPECTION



Examine the disc. If it is worn, warped or scored, it must be replaced. Check the thickness of the disc against the specifications given in the Brake Specifications chart. If it is below specifications, replace it. Use a micrometer to measure the thickness.

The disc run-out should be measured before the disc is removed and again, after the disc is installed. Use a dial indicator mounted on a stand, and position the pointer 0.39 inch (10mm) from the edge of the disc. If run-out exceeds 0.006 inch (0.15mm), replace the disc.


PRELOAD ADJUSTMENT



See Figures 1 and 2

  1. With the front hub/disc assembly installed, tighten the castellated nut to the torque figure specified in the Preload Specifications chart.
  2. Rotate the disc back and forth, two or three times, to allow the bearing to seat properly.
  3. Loosen the castellated nut until it is only finger-tight.
  4. Tighten the nut firmly, using a box wrench. Make sure the disc rotates smoothly.
  5. Measure the bearing preload with a spring scale attached to a wheel mounting stud. Check it against the specifications given in the Preload Specifications chart.
  6. Install the cotter pin.

If the hole does not align with the nut (or cap) holes, tighten the nut slightly until it does.

  1. Finish installing the brake components and the wheel.



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Fig. Fig. 1: Preload specification chart



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Fig. Fig. 2: Tighten the nut firmly, then measure the preload with a spring scale

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Brake Pads


1982-85 Celica and 1982-86 Supra

See Figures 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12



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Fig. Fig. 3: The brake caliper is mounted over the edge of the brake disc



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Fig. Fig. 4: When brake pads squeal on 1982-85 models, check the wear indicators



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Fig. Fig. 5: If necessary, retract the caliper piston using a C-clamp



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Fig. Fig. 6: Remove the lower caliper bolt and bushing ...



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Fig. Fig. 7: ... then pivot the caliper upward



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Fig. Fig. 8: Insert a bolt into the torque plate to secure the caliper



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Fig. Fig. 9: Slide the brake pads and clips out of the caliper ...



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Fig. Fig. 10: ... then inspect the pads and rotor for wear



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Fig. Fig. 11: When installing the new pads, be sure that the clips are all in good condition



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Fig. Fig. 12: The pads and clips must be positioned correctly; do not allow oil or grease on the components

  1. Remove the wheel cover, if equipped, and loosen the lug nuts.
  2. Jack up the front of the car and safely support it with jackstands.
  3. Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.
  4. Attach a clear vinyl tube onto the bleeder plug on the brake cylinder (caliper), and insert the other end into a jar half filled with brake fluid. Bleed off a small amount of brake fluid.
  5. Remove the caliper bolt by holding the sliding bushing. Lift up the caliper and insert a bolt into the torque plate hole to secure the caliper.
  6. Remove the brake pads along with the anti-squeal shim, anti-rattle springs, pad guide plates and the support plate.
  7. Install a new pad support plate, pad guide plates and new anti-rattle springs. Push the piston back into the cylinder if it is protruding.
  8. Install new pads onto each spring, installing the outside pad so that the wear indicator is at the top side.


CAUTION
When installing new brake pads, make sure your hands are clean. Do not allow any grease or oil to touch the contact face of the pads, or the brakes will not stop the car properly!

  1. Install the anti-squeal shim toward the inside of the pad.
  2. Remove the bolt from the torque plate and lower the caliper.

Position the caliper onto the rotor carefully so that the boot is not wedged.

  1. Tighten the caliper bolt to 12-17 ft. lbs. (16-23 Nm).
  2. Install the wheel and lug nuts. Lower the vehicle.
  3. Tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque, then install the wheel cover, if equipped.
  4. Top up the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid.
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Brake Shoes


REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figures 1 through 22

The parking brakes on rear disc brake equipped models are actually small drum brakes which work inside the brake rotor/hub. Their design and construction is virtually identical to the rear drum service brakes found on other models. Also, replacement shoes/linings are usually bought on an exchange basis, as are most drum type service brake shoes.

  1. Remove the rear disc brake assembly. Hang the caliper from the coil spring with a piece of string so the hose is not stretched.
  2. Using pliers, remove the brake return springs. Remove the shoe strut with the springs.
  3. Slide out the front brake shoe and remove the shoe adjusting screw set. Remove the tension spring, and remove the shoe.
  4. Slide out the rear shoe, and disconnect the parking brake cable from the parking brake shoe lever. Remove the rear brake shoe.
  5. Measure the brake shoe lining thickness. Standard thickness is 0.079 inch (2mm), and minimum allowable thickness is 0.039 inch (0.99mm). If the lining is thinner than minimum, replace the brake shoes on both wheels (to maintain even braking on both wheels). Maximum disc inside diameter is 6.61 inch (167mm).
  6. To reassemble the parking brake, apply non-melting type grease to the sliding surfaces on the back plate as shown. Apply the same grease to the adjusting screw threads.
  7. Compress the cable spring and connect the parking brake lever to the cable.
  8. Slide the rear brake shoe between the hold-down spring seat and the backing plate.


CAUTION
Do not allow oil or grease to contact the faces of the brake linings, as braking ability will be severely compromised.

  1. Install the tension spring to the rear shoe, and connect the front shoe to the tension spring. Install the shoe adjusting screw set between the front and rear shoes. Slide in the front shoe between the shoe hold-down spring seat and the backing plate.
  2. Install the front shoe return spring, and also the strut with the spring.
  3. Install the brake disc assembly by aligning the groove on the rear axle flange with the service hole on the disc. You may have to back off the adjuster to install the hub.
  4. Temporarily install the disc hub nuts. From the front side of the hub, turn the adjuster star wheel and expand the shoes until the disc cannot be turned by hand. Back off the adjuster wheel about 8 turns.
  5. Inspect and adjust the parking brake lever travel.



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Fig. Fig. 1: Remove the caliper from the rotor ...



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Fig. Fig. 2: ... then hang it off to the side with the brake hose attached



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Fig. Fig. 3: If necessary, back off the parking brake



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Fig. Fig. 4: Spray lubricant to aid in rotor removal



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Fig. Fig. 5: Thread two bolts into the rotor to ease removal before pulling off the disc



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Fig. Fig. 6: Inspect the parking shoes; as you can see, these shoes are moderately worn



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Fig. Fig. 7: Spray brake cleaner onto the components prior to removal to ease the job



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Fig. Fig. 8: Use a suitable tool to unhook the shoe return springs



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Fig. Fig. 9: Using a suitable tool, depress and twist the spring retainer 90°deg; ...



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Fig. Fig. 10: ... then remove the hold-down spring and retaining hardware



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Fig. Fig. 11: Parking shoe assembly removed from the axle shaft



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Fig. Fig. 12: Apply grease to the various areas shown



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Fig. Fig. 13: Apply grease to the adjusting screw set



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Fig. Fig. 14: Attach the parking brake lever to the cable ...



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Fig. Fig. 15: ... then install the tension spring, front shoe and shoe adjusting set



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Fig. Fig. 16: Install the front shoe return spring



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Fig. Fig. 17: Install the rear shoe and return spring



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Fig. Fig. 18: Align the groove on the axle shaft flange and service hole on the rotor



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Fig. Fig. 19: Adjust the parking brake shoe clearance ...



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Fig. Fig. 20: ... then replace the rubber plug



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Fig. Fig. 21: Pull the parking lever up all the way, and count the number of notches it travels



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Fig. Fig. 22: Exploded view of the parking brake shoe assembly


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Cable


ADJUSTMENT



  1. Remove the rear console box and parking brake lever boot.
  2. Slowly pull the parking brake lever upward without depressing the button on the end of it.
  3. When the lever has reached the end of its travel, look beneath it and count the number of notches (teeth). There should be 3-7 notches (5-8 notches on models with rear disc brakes) visible between the bottom of the unit and the tang on the lever.
  4. If the lever requires adjustment, loosen the lock nut and turn the adjusting nut clockwise to decrease the number of notches and counterclockwise to increase the number.
  5. When the setting is correct, tighten the lock nut, using care not to disturb the setting of the adjusting nut.
  6. Check that the rear wheels are not dragging when the wheels are turned.
  7. Reinstall the rear console box and boot.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION



See Figure 1

  1. Remove the rear console box.
  2. Remove the cable adjusting nut.
  3. Unscrew the four mounting bolts and remove the parking brake lever.
  4. Working under the car, disconnect the parking brake cable equalizer.
  5. Remove the two cable clamps from each side of the driveshaft tunnel.
  6. Remove the rear brakes and then disconnect the parking brake cable from the lever.
  7. Remove the cable from the brake backing plate.
  8. Installation is in the reverse order of removal.



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Fig. Fig. 1: Brake cable routing and lever components

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